Demand for Primary School Places Set to Rise

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Christiesgal's picture
Christiesgal
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Joined: 29/07/2011 - 13:46
Posts: 11093
Demand for Primary School Places Set to Rise

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-18996216

Quote:
England's primary school population is set to rise by 18% in the next eight years, experts are predicting.

And by 2015, numbers are expected to grow by 8%, according to statistics from the Department for Education.

Secondary school numbers have been falling and will continue to do so until 2015, when the surge in primary pupils will start to feed through.

The government has pledged to spend more than £4bn in the next four years on creating new school places.

Labour says the figures confirm there is a crisis in school places, but Schools Minister Lord Hill has accused Labour of ignoring warnings about population growth when in power.

Other recent projections said 450,000 new primary places would be needed in England by 2015.

There are hot-spots of need around the country, with London under the most pressure.

In London, by 2015, the primary age population is expected to be 18% higher than it was in 2010.

But the growth is not only expected in the South East. In the North East and South West, primary numbers are expected to rise by 9% over the same time.

So do  you think this will affect your aread?  Are there any new primary schools going up or being expanded to deal with the rising demand?

I did think that a lot of plans had been put on hold because of the government cuts but I could be wrong, but if I'm right it sounds like they are storing up trouble.

We have had a huge influx of Eastern Europeans into the area over the last 5 years or so, and yet no schools have been built..   So that, along with rising birth rates is making me wonder if class sizes are going up considerably.

In fact the last new school to go up was my daughters old primary school which opened in 1991, the year eldest was born!

ursh x

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JacquiL's picture
JacquiL
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 11:56
Posts: 25711

It's already chaos here, the demand far outstrips places, yet even though the warnings were given as long as 11 years ago that shutting a school just because it was ailing would leave the area I live in vulnerable for the future.
The school my youngest son goes to turned away 64 families this year, they have been refused planning permission to expand and so can only take 30 pupils a year

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xxJaneyxx
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Joined: 25/07/2011 - 14:19
Posts: 6958

Our primary took in extra pupils when another nearby school was closed a few years ago.  This meant creating a few new classrooms (by dividing what were very large rooms) and having three year groups instead of two in some years.  It wouldn't be possible though to have 3 groups in every year, so it couldn't increase intake from Reception/Foundation.onwards.