stress and opportunity

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ElectronBlue's picture
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stress and opportunity

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/jan/09/oliver-james-female-u...

An interesting article on stress and coping in the young- do we expect too much from our young? Is giving too much choice and opportunity harmful? Are we making our kids sick? It' worth a read- especially if you have girls.

A snippet from the article...

The greater wealth and opportunities of the young actually translate into significantly higher rates of mental illness, a fact that no one seems to want to think about.
...
It rather calls into question the consensus assumption that affluence and university degrees should be everyone's main goal in life.

pollylolly

To be honest Beth I can see where they are coming from - but I've felt for years we now offer our children too many choices and from far too young an age. They need to grow to independence whilst supported and do need to know that some times they have to do something just because and there is no choice.

I can see that it would affect girls more as they are more emotional - I know with K that given too many choices she freezes up and given choices that would entail something she knows I would want and one that would appeal to her much more she really gets upset and to the point of being over wraught to be honest.

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That's a really interesting article Beth. Am secretly pleased O isn't a girl, have enough guilt already!

In all seriousness, I agree that as parents we now expect our children to attend Uni and become affluent. I've had a Uni fund for O since before he was born, most of the Mums I know have done the same. But realistically, he may not want to go, he may not get the grades. I think I'm ok with that, because the majority of my family didn't go to Uni and they all have a great work ethic and careers they enjoy, which is more important to me.

I don't think it helps that children have to take SATS and the like from a young age. My nephew is about to move up to High School in September and has taken 3 different sets of exams applying for places in "good" schools, and I kid you not, he's worried himself sick about these bloody tests, and for what? He'll still get good grades, he'll still fly through his GCSE's because he's a bright and articulate little fella. It's all because his Mum insists he has to go to a certain standard of school. To my mind, that's too much pressure and not enough fun. He's 10, his main aim in life should be how much chocolate he can eat and playing more sonic, not lying in bed at night crying because he thinks he got a question wrong on his test.

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Females are just weird. 8}

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ElectronBlue
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oi!

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Opps, sorry.

What I meant was, from the article:

“Women nearly always come out in surveys as being twice as distressed as men at all ages.”

Okay, take that as our base. Men and women are different and, it turns out, in surveys women come out as being twice as distressed. Then, from the article:

“A recent study of French first years found that 16% of the men and 33% of the women suffered psychological distress (anxiety or depression) by the year's end.”

Now, whether 16% is high or low is something we can discuss but, given that and our base, we would expect women to be 32% - which it practically is.

Again from the article:
“All in all, just as parents in the "higher" classes should worry like hell about their 15-year-old daughters (43% of whom are distressed, compared with 24% of higher-class boys)...”

Again, is 24% high or low? Either way, we expect girls to be at 48%, and they actually come in a little under.

Furthermore it seems that less (percentage-speaking) are distressed at university than at school.

So, the result seems to be that men and women have different reactions to surveys on stress, but those reaction are predictable in that women come out as being twice as distressed.

Or, Females are weird.

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JacquiL
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French females that is Daedy

pollylolly

LOL interesting interpretation Daedy and Char you hit one nail on the head the SAT's and other tests should be binned so much stress for such young children it's plain wrong.