Would you lie about your child's age?

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elaine80's picture
elaine80
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 19:18
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Would you lie about your child's age?

Every summer our church runs a week long holiday club for children who have been in primary school in the previous school year. I have always refused to get involved as I do my bit through the year and refuse to run a free babysitting service. Last year they needed a volunteer to put together a database of the kids and I volunteered because I was sick of under age kids being let in because those dealing with the forms haven't a clue (DH always ends up helping out and wouldn't take DD2 just before she started school despite others in similar circumstances being allowed so it is a sore point).
I have just seen some of the forms for this year and one of the kids who was there last year as a primary 1 is mysteriously a primary 1 again with a date of birth 16 months younger than the one that was used last year (it appeared we had twins from the family last year but in fact they children aren't twins). Last year I heard one of the leaders question the mum of one of DD1's friends about one of her children and she admitted to lying about the child's age and sending her too young to avoid a tantrum because the child was going to be left out.
Would you lie about your child's age just to get a few hours peace? Looking at it from a risk assessment point of view, my worry is that in an emergency if the child needed medical treatment and the parent couldn't be contacted the name and date of birth we were given wouldn't match up with any medical records.

JacquiL's picture
JacquiL
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 11:56
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I wouldn't do it, 

OliversArmy's picture
OliversArmy
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 13:45
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No, I don't think I would, mainly because as you say, Elaine, if there was a medical emergency it could risk things if you hadn't given the correct dob. And no amount of peace and quiet would make up for lying about it; I'd be forever fretting in case I got caught out. 

On holiday there were a couple of activities that were for 2 years plus, which Olly desperately wanted to do. George looks over 2, in fact he looks 47 most days, but we decided not to risk it and I took Olly by himself while DH took George swimming and to the park. Surely that's what all parents do when only one child is old enough for something?

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Miss Poppins
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 09:21
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No i wouldnt lie about her age for something like that.  Like OA said you just do something else with the child thats too young, its not worth the risk if there was an emergency.

I did however lie about Abbies age at the carvery last week so i could get her a child price instead of an adult price :shy:

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scarymary
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 17:56
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Absolutely not. I have been involved in these holiday clubs over the years. The biggest issue (beyond that of a child having an accident/being taken ill) is insurance. The cl,ub will have public liability insurance with clauses, one of which will be the age range of the children in the club. In fact, you could go so far as to say that as the parents are deliberately claiming that their children are older than they are they could be committing fraud! On the other hand, as YS has always looked much older than he is I have spent many years carrying his passport around just to prove he is entitled to child entry to places!!

Dawn

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sparkledust
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Joined: 29/11/2009 - 17:57
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A friend of mine tried that when we went to Haven to get her son into an archery course, they had to be 11 & neither my YD or her S were 11, close but not 11.  I said no, she chucked a bigger strop than her son, which just proved a point.

I remember my Mum doing it once so she didn't have to pay for us to go into a zoo somewhere, I still remember my sister shouting from the back of the car that she was 5....lol.

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JacquiL
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Joined: 26/11/2009 - 11:56
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My brother once threw a strop when he was told that it was free for him to go into an historic garden in Ireland. He kept shouting I'm not free I'm 4. My mum, dad and aunts were in hysterics and of course we bring it up whenever he gets too big for his boots

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Barefootgirl
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Joined: 25/07/2011 - 14:18
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I'd like to try it, but I know that if I did, my DD would say in her loudest, most carrying voice, "But I'm NOT that age, Mummy, I'm (age-that-incurs-a-charge)!!".

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ElectronBlue
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Joined: 27/07/2011 - 10:11
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I couldn't even do that Miss P... Alex would be hearing me tell a lie and I couldn't live with that :(

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Barefootgirl
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Joined: 25/07/2011 - 14:18
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You could always send him off to the loo, EB....

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Corris
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Joined: 25/07/2011 - 14:18
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I wouldn't in that case, but I have in in another......

Scottish youth hostels never used to allow children to stay that were under 5 years old.  Mine were 4 and 5, so for an entire summer they were 5 and 6.

Generally I tell the truth and must look poor because the people usually selling tickets say 'oh, I'll say they were under 16'  I think it's because YD is short.  It even happened on holiday last week -  YS is now 6.4, and 16 years old, and they said 'oh, I'll put him under 14' and gave me a cheaper ticket.  Perhaps they just pity me?

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