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Identifying simple, compound and complex sentences worksheet
Can you identify if these sentences are simple, compound or complex?

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Identifying past perfect sentences worksheet
Verb tenses tell us when an action took place. The past perfect tense is used to describe an action that has occurred before another action in the past. Look at the following sentences. Can you underline the verbs that are in the past perfect?

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Identifying main and subordinate clauses worksheet
A clause is a part of a sentence that contains a verb. A subordinate clause is one that is dependent on a main clause and does not make sense on its own. We use connectives to join two clauses. Read these sentences. Can you underline the main clause in blue, the subordinate clause in red and the conjunction in green?

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Forming the superlative worksheet
We use superlative adjectives to compare one thing to all the others in the same category. Look at the adjectives in the left-hand column. Can you write the superlative form on the right-hand side?

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Conjunctions in compound and complex sentences worksheet
Co-ordinating conjunctions join clauses of equal weight. Subordinating conjunctions join main clauses and the subordinate clauses that depend on them. Read these sentences. Can you underline the main clause in blue, the subordinate clause in red and the conjunction in black?

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Comparative forms of adjectives worksheet
Adjectives have three different forms: the positive, the comparative and the superlative. We use the comparative form of adjectives to to compare one thing to another. The comparative is formed differently depending on the adjective’s positive form. Look at these sentences. Can you change the word in the box to its comparative form?

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Comparative and superlative adjectives worksheet
We use comparative and superlative adjectives to compare things and people. Can you choose the right word from the word bank to complete each sentence, then tick the boxes on the right to show whether this word is a comparative or a superlative?

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Comparative adjectives worksheet
We use comparative adjectives to compare one thing to another. Look at the adjectives in the left-hand column. Can you write the comparative form on the right-hand side?

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Co-ordinating conjunctions worksheet
We use co-ordinating conjunctions to join two clauses of a sentence that are of ‘equal weight’ (each one could be a stand-alone sentence). Read these sentences and think about which co-ordinating conjunction could go in each gap.

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Co-ordinating and subordinating conjunctions worksheet
We use co-ordinating conjunctions to join two clauses of a compound sentence that are of equal weight. A subordinating conjunction introduces a subordinate clause (a clause that does not make sense on its own). Read the following sentences and tick whether you think the conjunction used in each is co-ordinating or subordinating

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Changing words to antonyms by adding prefixes worksheet
Antonyms are words with opposite meanings to each other. For example, ‘good’ is an antonym of ‘bad’. A prefix is a group of letters added to the beginning of a root word; for example, the prefix ‘un’ can be added to the root word ‘happy’ to make the word ‘unhappy’. Can you turn each of these words into its antonym by choosing the correct prefix from this row?

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Arranging simple, compound and complex sentences worksheet
A simple sentence is made up of one clause. A compound sentence is made up of two clauses of equal weight. A complex sentence is made up of a main clause and a subordinate clause. Can you reorder these words to reveal three sentences that make sense?

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Adding clauses to sentences worksheet
Look at the following simple sentences. Can you turn them into compound and complex sentences with the conjunctions given?

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Using the subjunctive worksheet
The subjunctive is used to express wishes, hopes, commands, demands or suggestions. The subjunctive is the same as the (indicative) verbs we use in most every case, but different in the third person singular (we remove the ‘s’) and when using to be (the forms ‘I were’ and ‘they be’ are used). Can you identify sentences in which the subjunctive has been used?

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Transitive and intransitive verbs worksheet
A transitive verb is one that needs an object to complete its meaning in a sentence. An intransitive verb does not need an object. Complete these sentences with the given verbs.

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Transitive and intransitive verbs: writing sentences worksheet
When you’re deciding if a verb is transitive or intransitive, remember: if you can say what or whom the verb affected in the sentence, it’s transitive. Look at each of these pictures. Write a sentence to go with them. Is the verb you’ve used transitive or intransitive?

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Transitive and intransitive verbs: making sentences out of word cards
A transitive verb is one that needs an object to complete its meaning. Cut out these words and see if you can put them together to make three sentences containing transitive verbs and three sentences containing intransitive verbs.

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Subjunctive: writing your own sentences worksheet
The subjunctive is used to express things that may happen as well as wishes, hopes, commands or suggestions. Can you complete each of the sentences below using the subjunctive?

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Subjunctive or future tense worksheet
The subjunctive is a verb form or mood used to express things that could or should happen (wishes, hopes, commands, demands or suggestions). Look at these sentences. Can you identify which are written in the future tense and which are subjunctive?

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Subjunctive: matching halves of sentences worksheet
The subjunctive is used to express things that may happen. It is used to express wishes, hopes, commands or suggestions. Ten sentences that use the subjunctive have been cut in half and then mixed up. Can you match them up in a way that makes sense?

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