all Grammar worksheets by Subject

Using simple sentences

Using simple sentences

Cut out the sentences below. Read them with your mum and dad, then sticky-tape them to objects around your house. Challenge an adult to find where you have placed them all!
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Introducing capital letters and full stops

Introducing capital letters and full stops

Sentences start with a capital letter and end with a full stop. Jim has missed out his capital letters and full stops. Can you add them in for him?
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Spelling patterns: doubling a letter and adding -ed / -ing

Spelling patterns: doubling a letter and adding -ed / -ing

With some three-letter verbs, if you need to add -ed or -ing, you need to double the last letter. This rule is followed whenever the verb has a short vowel followed by a consonant. Read this passage aloud, then write down each coloured word. Check the words and then learn to spell any you get wrong.
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Verb tenses: adding -ing

Verb tenses: adding -ing

The basic form of a verb is the INFINITIVE. To show that something is still happening in the present, we use the PRESENT PARTICIPLE, which we make by adding -ing to the verb. If a verb ends with a silent ‘e’ which isn’t pronounced it needs to be dropped before you add -ing to make the present participle. Cover over the table. Can you write the correct words ending -ing in the spaces below?
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Spelling patterns: turning adjectives ending -y into nouns and adverbs

Spelling patterns: turning adjectives ending -y into nouns and adverbs

Usually, when an adjective ending in –y needs to be changed into a noun or adverb, the y turns to an i. Can you change these adjectives to their noun and adverb form? Remember to turn the y into an i before you add the -ness / -ly ending!
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Spelling patterns: the suffix -ful

Spelling patterns: the suffix -ful

We use the suffix -ful to make adjectives, but watch out – although the word ‘full’ has been put on the end of ‘hope’, the last l is dropped. Can you complete this table to show how words are changed by adding the suffix-ful? Then find all the words ending -ful above in this wordsearch.
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Spelling patterns: the prefixes ir-, il-, in- and im-

Spelling patterns: the prefixes ir-, il-, in- and im-

To make a word the opposite of what it means, you often put the prefixes ir-, il-, in- or im- before it. Match these prefix cards to the words below. Can you see any pattern in the way you match them?
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Spelling patterns: the prefix trans- worksheet

Spelling patterns: the prefix trans-

All these words begin with the prefix trans-. Can you cut them out and match them up with the correct definitions below? Looking at these words and definitions, what do you think the prefix trans- means? Have a go working it out and then check your answer on the internet or in the library
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Spelling patterns: the prefix tele- worksheet

Spelling patterns: the prefix tele-

All these words begin with the prefix tele-. Can you cut them out and match them up with the correct definitions below?
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Spelling patterns: the prefix cir- worksheet

Spelling patterns: the prefix cir-

Can you complete this mini-wordsearch? All the words you need start with the prefix circ- and are below. What do you think circ- means?
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Spelling patterns: the prefix bi- worksheet

Spelling patterns: the prefix bi-

Can you complete this mini-crossword? All the words you need start with the prefix bi- and are listed below. What do you think bi- means?
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Spelling patterns: the prefix auto-

Spelling patterns: the prefix auto-

Look up these words in the dictionary and write their definitions below. What do you think the prefix auto means?
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Adding -ves to form the plural worksheet

Adding -ves to form the plural

Can you complete this fun mini-crossword with the plurals of these words? Be careful though – you can't just add -s to these words like you normally would to make a word plural.
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Using similes to describe character and setting

Using similes to describe character and setting

Similes compare something to something else using the words ‘like’ or ‘as’. Can you think of some descriptive similes to finish these sentences?
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Direct speech rules and punctuation worksheet

Direct speech rules and punctuation

Read the Baba Yaga story, the write the conversation that you think Natasha’s father (Otto) might have with his wife (Ivanka) when he banishes her from the house. Remember the rules of direct speech and punctuation.
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Adding -s and -es to form the plural worksheet

Adding -s and -es to form the plural

When something is singular, there is one of it. When something is plural there are two or more of it. Usually, we just put an -s on the end of a word to show it is plural. But to make some words plural we need to add -es to the singular word. Can you complete these sentences using the words above in their plural form?
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Writing speech worksheet

Writing speech

How does Polydectes challenge Perseus and convince him to brave the fearsome Medusa’s lair? Their conversation is started below; can you continue writing the speech using the correct punctuation?
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Answering open and closed questions worksheet

Answering open and closed questions

A closed question is one which only requires a simple answer (usually one word), for example: What is your name? An open question allows the person being asked to talk more freely in a variety of different ways, for example: How are you feeling? Here are some questions for Perseus. Cut them out and sort them into a pile of closed questions and a pile of open questions.
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Using similes to describe setting worksheet

Using similes to describe setting

When you are writing, similes are a really effective way to give people a picture in their mind of something you are describing. A SIMILE is a comparison – it finds similar characteristics in two objects and compares them. It always uses the words ‘like’ or ‘as’ to make the comparison. Look at this picture and use the simile starters to write your own similes.
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Spelling wordsearch: the suffix -hood

Spelling wordsearch: the suffix -hood

Each of these words ending in -hood is hidden in the wordsearch. Can you find them and insert them into the sentences below?
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